Capture and share VR photos with Cardboard Camera, now on iOS

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Whether you’re hiking on the Olympic Peninsula or attending your cousin’s wedding, go beyond the flat photo or selfie. With Cardboard Camera—now available on iOS as well as Android—you can capture 3D 360-degree virtual reality photos. Just like Google Cardboard, it works with the phone you already have with you.

VR photos taken with Cardboard Camera are three-dimensional panoramas that can transport you right back to the moment. Near things look near and far things look far. You can look around to explore the image in all directions, and even hear sound recorded while you took the photo to hear the moment exactly as it happened. To capture a VR photo, hold your phone vertically, tap record, then turn around as though you’re taking a panorama.

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Starting today, you can also share your VR photos with friends and family on both iPhone and Android devices. Select multiple photos to create a virtual photo album, tap the share icon, and Cardboard Camera will generate a link (like this) that can be emailed, messaged, or posted in apps and on the web. With a VR viewer like Google Cardboard, your friends can relive those moments as if they were there.

via Google

Google’s Project Ara modular phone is reportedly suspended

But the company could still license out the technology to other phonemakers.

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Google’s big plans for Project Ara might never pan out. According to Reuters, the big G has decided to shelve its modular phone initiative. Earlier this year, the company said it will be releasing a developer phone with interchangeable components in the fourth quarter of 2016 ahead of a consumer version scheduled for 2017. Alas, that might no longer happen.

Mountain View is reportedly suspending Ara “as part of a broader push to streamline the company’s hardware efforts.” It’ll be tough releasing a consumer version of a phone with interchangeable components, after all, even though the latest prototype isn’t as customizable as Motorola originally envisioned. The company will have to manufacture not just the units themselves, but also the modular speakers and cameras that people can swap out.

Those same sources said Google’s modular phone dream might not be completely dead, though. The company could still license out Project Ara’s technology to other phonemakers, which could eventually and finally release a version we can buy.

via Reuters